The MockingJay Project

The MockingJay Project is a sub-group of Oregonians for Medical Freedom (OFMF) focused on analyzing Covid-19 and its impact on Oregon. The MockingJay Project is here to break down different elements of the virus and how it is affecting our great state, while providing a better understanding for citizens. We will consistently provide in-depth, referenced, and accessible articles that are extensively reviewed by experts. Regardless of your stance on these topics (lockdowns, mandates, vaccines, or masks) forcing the public to follow strict mandates is a violation of civil liberties and medical freedom. Please read and share our articles listed below.

New items will be added periodically so feel free to check back often. Join our OFMF mailing list to be made aware of new articles as they are launched at OFMF Coalition Newsletter – Oregonians for Medical Freedom

OSHA set to make permanent workplace Covid-19 Rules

Greetings fellow freedom fighters! We wanted to bring to everyone’s attention OSHA is proposing to make Covid-19 workplace rules permanent and we need your help! Their reasoning behind such a drastic action? The Covid-19 workplace rules are temporary and set to expire in May without the ability to be extended. They will be made permanent and according to their website, OSHA “expects to repeal the “all or part” of the permanent rules once it is no longer needed to address the coronavirus pandemic.” Exactly when that would be is not specified." This applies to all sectors such as schools, contractors, restaurants, gyms etc. The time for public comment has passed but written testimony can be sent until Friday April 2nd. Please let them know...

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Oregonians For Medical Freedom Sends Cease and Desist Letter to OHA for Misinformation about COVID-19 Vaccines in Clear EUA Violation; Third Attempt to Hold OHA Accountable for Inaccurate Statements

For Immediate Release: March 5, 2021 Media Contact: [email protected] The statewide grassroots organization Oregonians for Medical Freedom recently delivered a “Cease and Desist” letter to the Oregon Health Authority to stop the agency from spreading misinformation to the public about COVID-19 vaccines. The OHA had been falsely stating on it’s website and social media posts that the COVID-19 vaccines have been “approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the Western Pact Vaccine workgroup.” Oregonians for Medical Freedom, through its attorney Robert Snee, sent a cease and desist letter to the OHA and Governor Kate Brown in January demanding that they correct the misinformation regarding the status of COVID-19...

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COVID-19 Deaths Deciphered

View PDF Version Oregon reported 1,388 COVID-19 deaths as of December 20, 2020.1 To understand the relevance of this number, it is important to have a solid understanding of how overall deaths from 2020 compare to historical data, how deaths are reported, what constitutes a COVID-19 death, and the accuracy of deaths reported. Oregon Deaths per Year Over the past 3 years, Oregon averaged 36,743 annual deaths2 with cancer and heart disease historically being the leading causes.3 As of December 20, 2020, Oregon has had 38,304 deaths with COVID-19 only accounting for 3.6% (1,388 / 38,304). The number of Oregon’s 2020 deaths is 3,167 more than the 3 year average for the same time range (this is known as excess deaths).4 What is extremely...

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PCR Tests Unraveled

View PDF version Oregon Governor Kate Brown is using results from PCR tests to determine public policy in Oregon. The current metric (as of December 2020) is calculated using positive tests divided by total tests given. Is this an effective or accurate way to determine actual infection rates in the state? In this article, you will learn what a PCR test is and how it works. You will learn its deficiencies and exactly why it is unreliable. What is the PCR Test? The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a process designed by Dr. Kary Mullis in 1984 used to “amplify” or copy small segments of DNA.1,2 It  uses a series of chemicals (primers) to detect segments of DNA in a test sample, like those taken with a nasal swab.3  Amplification using PCR...

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